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  • QuiBids Review – The Truth

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    QuiBids Review: At a Glance                                                                 

    Online auction sites are nothing new, however QuiBids is an online auction site with a twist.  This auction site, or entertainment auction site, as it officially prefers to be called, resets the timer countdown allowing bidding to continue until no one is bidding any more.  This actually simulates more closely the offline auction mode where there is no timer present.

    Official website: http://www.quibids.com/
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    QuiBids Review: A Closer Look

    QuiBids is a place where one  may be able to win an auction for mere pennies,

    QuiBids Review

    but it actually has several “twists” that make it different from other online auction sites.  These concern the predetermined bid increments; the need to actually purchase bids; and the clock management technique.

    • Every auction has a predetermined amount that each bid increases the sales price. These bid increments seem to be either one penny, two cents or five cents
    • Upon creating an account, in order to participate in an auction it is necessary to buy bids. Prepaid bid packs are sold at the rate of $.60 per bid. This means that every time a bid is placed it cost the bidder $.60.
    • Each auction has a timer that counts down continuously until it gets below 20 seconds left. From that point the timer will be reset to 20 seconds each time a bid is placed. If this process continues too long, QuiBids will then reset the timer to 15 seconds and finally to ten seconds until no one bids again and the timer runs out ending the auction.

    These features  also make the bidding strategy different for this site than other auction sites. For this reason, QuiBids provides beginner’s auctions that seem to have typically lower valued items to allow people to learn the system before attempting to win a higher ticket item. They also suggest watching auctions of items similar to those that a person is interested in, to gain insight to the process.

    QuiBids not only uses the timer to try to give everyone an equal opportunity to win an auction, they also actually limit the number of auctions any one person can win within a specified time frame. Any single user account may win a maximum of 12 auctions within a 28 day timeframe. Additionally any single user may only win thpree auctions in any 24 hour period, and furthermore may only win one auction of the same item with a value of $285 during any 28 day time frame.

    QuiBids- The Truth

    This auction site,started in 2009, is indeed enough different that it may cause people trouble until the differences are fully understood. The idea that each bid costs $.60 means that if regardless of whether you  win the item, you are still paying that $.60 for each bid you placed. It can be a little confusing since the actual bid price only goes up 1 cent but it costs 60 cents to place the bid. Certainly QuiBids offers the opportunity to purchase items at a greatly reduced rate and the site seems to go to great lengths to educate its users. Most complaints appear to come from those who did not completely understand the program. So before jumping into this program, do your homework and you will have a much better experience.

    Do you have any experience with QuiBids? I welcome any comment or opinions.


    Sincerely,

    Rich Riley
    "Helping People Make Better Decisions Through Better Information"

    NOTE: If you are seriously looking for legitimate ways to generate income and build a successful online business, I STRONGLY RECOMMEND you click here and discover this prosperity formula .
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    50 Responses to QuiBids Review – The Truth

    1. Pat Hughes says:

      I have used and monitored quibids for the last 10 day’s. What I found is this the auctions may be legit but there are a lot of fictional bidders. Myself and a crew of three others kept hard copies of all actions, particularly the voucher bid games after collecting thousands of game copies we fed the names into a statistical analysis and found the winners for the most part repeated themselves enough to outweigh skill. There is a lot I could add about our findings the different shifts different fictional bidders are used in the fact that with most winners that reflect small amounts invested with a large return are not “real” bidders. Initially we thought it was just an outside group that were coordinating efforts inorder to win big. But this is not the case—this company is using fictional bidders to prevent real bidders from winning. Beware–after an initial win or two you will find your return is extremely limited, costly and you will be contributing to an incredible profit making company who is deceitful and unethical. I do not know how they have stayed in business but we plan to turn over the information and analysis we have done to the Federal Trade Commission. Please protect yourself.

    2. Matt A. says:

      Quibids isn’t a scam in the strictest sense, but it does deceive and manipulate its users in two wicked ways;

      1) they overprice the retail value of items considerably – that is simply wrong. A $25 iTunes gift card with a retail price of $30?
      2) the concept of voucher bids is designed with the sole purpose of enticing real money bidders into bidding wars. I have seen players who play purely with voucher bids and they can bid endlessly – end result real money bidders lose, or are only left with the Buy Now option which is overpriced in the first place.

      The only kind of player that succeeds on Quibids is the voucher bidder who has endless time on his/her hands.

      I asked for my unused bid money back within 2 days of starting, only a fool will bid real money on this farce.

    3. Paulette says:

      I signed up ..entered my card information and the next thing I knew . Every penny that was in my account was gone . I never said I wanted to add any amount into my account . I do not know how they feel they can do that . But I should have been asked how much I was putting into that account . Sorry This site is a rip off . I am disputing the charge . Id stay away from this web site ….Like I said they must have kept running a total till it went thru my bank ……Bad Business .

      • Linda says:

        Clicking on the Quibids Website is the dumbest thing I’ve ever done!
        I didn’t even realize they would charge upfront amount… I tried to dispute the charge but it’s been very hard. Don’t make the same mistake I did.
        Stay away from them!!

    4. Dianne. M says:

      Boy am I glad I read this before sighning up thank you

    5. Mike says:

      You know what they say, if it looks and walks like a duck…..

      No way this company isn’t a major scam. $0.60 per bid just to possibly end up having to make 100 or more bids to simply lose and get nothing?

      Are you kidding me? Only a fool would fall for this type of BS.

      Genius though are the guys who created this site. Genius or crooks. Take your pick.

    6. Zoey says:

      I am a newcomer to Quibids, I watched the bidding closely as was told to do. I started bidding on a Voucher bid item, I was bidding to stay on top and twice as I was staying on top of two different Voucher item’s , Up popped ( Item temporarily out ). And the Photo of the Fake Voucher Coins went into a see through gray. All my bids ( my cash ) went down the drain. Both of theses item’s had many bidders and went on for quite awhile.
      We all know that Voucher bids can not be temorarily out.
      I have emailed them and will keep all posted on the outcome of my adventure.
      Thanks for the chance to put my in put.

    7. victor says:

      i started biding on quibids after i did a little bit of homework as you mentioned, with my initial $60 dollars i purchase a nice casio watch for only like 3 dollars, i put and extra 25 dollar into my account and i started biding on other products i could never win, the real price for the watch was 49 dollars. Concluding you spend a lot more biding than you save be very careful with this web site

    8. Dean Tab says:

      These sites are no different to playing slot machines, actually let me Re-phrase that, I should say no different to playing the “Lotto”
      Just to make it clear, I HATE slot machines with a passion, however if someone said here’s $100 but you have to spend on either slot machines or on sites like this, (Penny Auction Sites) I would defiantly chose the slot machines over this.
      The reason being, ALL these “Penny Auction Sites” have people bidding for them on these items, to make sure the price continues to increase, in the mean time the company is making MILLIONS.

      It’s a great idea for the companies/owners of all these sites, as there making a absolute killing.
      Lets say for example your bidding on a ipad that has a retail value of $500 by the time the ipad is sold on these “Penny Auction Sites” these companies would generate on a average between 5 to 10+ times the amount of what the item cost them.
      So for example this $500 ipad would end up generating these “Penny Auction Sites” a profit of at least $2,000 up to $4,000+ for each ipod sold.

      The other important fact one must consider, out of ALL the products that are selling on these “Penny Auction Sites” there is nothing stopping the winning bid coming from the people who are bidding on each item for the company itself.
      So the ipad I mentioned above may never be shipped to anyone because they themselves won the bid. God knows how many times this happens.

      In short these sites are nothing different then winning a lottery.
      I promise you this, you have a much better chance putting your money in a slot machine and generating a profit compared to throwing your money away on “Penny Auction sites” hoping to purchase a so called BARGAIN.
      I don’t know how many friends you guys may have, but if some of you have allot of friends, try to get a large group of people involved and ask each person to put $10, $20, or however much each person is willing to fork out and lose. If you try this, its vital that your willing to throw this money away and use it as a experiment, should you be lucky enough to WIN then think of it as a HUGE bonus.
      Then split the total in half. Spend half of it on the slot machines and once you double your money PULL OUT, even IF it happens on the first spin, DON’T CONTINUE PLAYING.
      Then put the other half on a “Penny Auction Site” and see how you go. I bet it won’t take you long before you realize TO KEEP AWAY FROM THESE SHOCKING SITES.

      IF you happen to win at both the “Slots” and on these “Penny Auction Sites” I suggest you do purchase a Lotto ticket. Good Luck.

    9. LVM says:

      If thinking of using the site, as many of the posts have previously mentioned, read the information provided by Quibids and take on board some of the comments on this site. Everyone is going to make posts dependent on their own experiences and they are, of course, going to be somewhat biased. As Quibids suggests, watch some of the auctions to get a feel of how it works – watch at various times of the day as well. It is busier when people are home from work and try to take note of who is in each auction. Some bidders will be in several auctions. Take note of who has won what in previous auctions via the Recently Completed link. If a bidder has just won a 250 Voucher bid auction and they are now in a 50 voucher bid auction then they have a better chance of winning it.

      Some of the smaller items do go for $0.1 but sometimes they go way past their value in terms of how much you yourself actually put in. If you are bidding in a Voucher Bid auction using Real bids, it will get to a point where it won’t allow you to bid any further than the value amount and you can use the buy now option. You will get back what you have bid almost because there is some sales tax on remaining bids which you haven’t been able to bid on. It’s better than nothing for your money. These bids will now be voucher bids and if you use them in another voucher bid auction and use them up again without winning then you are unable to use the buy now option withe them. The buy now is only available with real bids. It is the same with item auctions too. In a voucher bid action there isn’t a limit set on how many you can use and there are those bidders who will continue bidding until they win. I saw one auction where the bidder won it using 156 voucher bids and several new bidders had attempted to win it also. This is why it is crucial to watch for as long as possible before attempting to bid so you can see who the ‘power’ bidders are. You can also see how much some people have won, and lost, on allpennyauctions.com: you can also see how much you have won and lost. I looked recently and one of the ‘power’ bidders who has no limits had spent $30,000 but their wins were $20,000. I don’t think that it is correct to say that Quibids lets you win a few small auctions to begin with because I didn’t: It took me awhile to win but then I won several in a row. I have won a few items around a hundred dollars and heaps of smaller items. Sometimes it has been a bargain and other times not. The best way to look at it is how much you have spent against your actual winnings because it is easy to lose track when you are using voucher bids. If you are in an auction using voucher bids you are going to keep trying to win it because you can’t use the bid now and you might use up all of your hard earned bids. To me, in the end, it is about how much I have paid out over all. At the moment I am behind and I probably wouldn’t have gone out and bought a lot of the items I have won. They are good to have on hand as gifts and have been valuable in that regard: in fact I used one for a 21st last night and it was the perfect gift – I didn’t have time to shop plus the cost of fuel so it was worth it.

      It is also possible that some bidders are wining several similar items and reselling them. A 25 Voucher bid auction, just a few seconds ago, went for $1.19. They used up 48 voucher bids to win it. Those who know this bidder are then likely not to enter the auction. If there are no new unwary bidders and no other bidders of the same ilk, then they will win. If they win several in a row and win for little output then they become a hard bidder to bid against. If they are in an auction without Bid-O-Matic then there is a chance that they might slip up and not place a bid in time but, generally, this bidder places them early enough for that not to occur. I watch these auctions hoping they run out, or have left because they have been using real bids.

      There are no guarantees, no absolutes. Many do have to lose for one to win. It most definitely is a gamble and as an earlier post mentioned “you don’t expect to get any money back if you don’t win the lottery” but with Quibids there is a possibility of ending up with something. You might be the lucky one who snares a bargain and good luck to you if you do.

      At the end of the day, do your homework first and be informed!

      • bob says:

        lvm, makes some really good comments – there are a few troubling things that are hard to explain away though – over a long period of time, i’ve noticed that when a item is at 0.00 with a small amount of time left (say under a minute) and you click on it … POOF … magically there will be bids when you get there – of course this could be a coincidence – when it happens over-and-over (it will, try it), it begins to feel like the game is fixed

    10. Lesley St. Nicholas says:

      Interesting array of experiences…. I received an email come-on from QuiBids and went straight down to Terms and conditions. I was looking specifically for bidding costs, fees or anything else that spoke of financial output. I didn’t get very far before I had to attend to something that took me away for about 10 minutes. When I attempted to return to Terms and Conditions, regardless how many times and ways I tried, the link was blocked in allowing me to do so.
      In reading many comments and complaints, I understand why this site has been very successful in its capacity to draw people in. Gambling, has been the best description of how this company has structured its business and I have been told, never gamble with more than you are prepared to lose!
      More people should read comment sites like this before spending hard earned money in cyber-world where tangebility and accountability is out there too.

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    12. MLW says:

      It’s so hard to earn a dollar. I have no idea why people get caught up in scams like this, nor do I understand why people can’t wait to give their money to casinos. I wonder how many of the positive comments on here are actually planted by the site. They sound very much like marketing speak to me.

    13. Ray says:

      First, understand that Quibids doesnt “let” you win an item. You either have won it or you havent. You have the choice to become as involved as you want with Quibids. People need to take responsiblity for their own habits and stop blaming other entities for their habits. The best way to utilize Quibids is find an item you are willing to pay full price for and try to win the bid. If you win, you will take advantage of a superb deal. If you lose the bid, you then have the option of paying the difference for the item and pay the full price regardless. Don’t use Quibids as a gambling site. Instead, use it to your own advantage and try to get some great deals.

    14. Jake says:

      These penny auction sites have been compared to gambling casinos, the house actually rakes in more than the retail price of the item sold, despite the ridiculously low selling prices in the ads the suck in the customers. There are the lucky winners, but for every winner there are several losers with nothing to show for the non refundable bids they put in. Some participants have pointed out you can make something of your bid commitment using some buy now option.

      If you like the excitement of putting some money at risk, perhaps their $60 signup fee is safer than doing it with online poker.

      Quibids appears to be the largest of the penny auctions, by responding to customer complaints, most of which are about the $60 signup fee being overlooked, they manage to maintain a BBB (Better Business Bureau) A- rating.

      • dougie says:

        Hey there….That BBB rating is about to change:) I have the Attorney General here involved about how this company is misleading consumers by not properly disclosing its signup fees and then extracting money from your credit card. They should have made the wise decision and gave me my money back when I notified them. However, they are about smacked with a class action ( from a private firm) as well !!! – Mess with the bull ….receive the horns!!!

    15. Tal says:

      I used Quibid in the Spring of 2011 and actually won a couple of great items! I won a Sony digital camera, for around $5.00 and only placed about 10 bids to win. The camera was a $700 item, and my teenage son (a budding photographer) uses the camera daily and loves it! I won, for myself, a pair of Dr Dre Solo Beats headphones. I paid around $24 for them including bid cost, shipping, and the item. After that, I won a couple of small, penny gift cards and was pretty happy. Then, the downfall happened. No matter what I did, I couldn’t win. I ended up shelling out a couple hundred bucks for a wine refrigerator (after I maxed out my bids), which I wanted to buy anyway, but didn’t want to pay full price for. Then I started spending more and more money on bids and never won again. With the camera and the headphones, I came out ahead, but only because I realized enough was enough and stopped wasting my money.

    16. Brian Cookman says:

      Have been a member of Quibids for a number of months, and did not realize, untill reading the above, that they suck you in, in the begining, by letting you win your first few items for pennies. Since, I have won or purchased quite a number of gift cards, and I say purchased, because thats what I do. If I get hooked, by spending or bidding 85% of the item cost, I use their buy it now, so at least I’m getting my money back, yes, I have to pay shipping of $3.38, including HST,but its beter than loosing my money. The only thing is, they take their full 14 bussiness days to mail it out, even though they send you an E Mail with in four to six days, stating that this item has been mailed, except it has not been mailed, and will take another ten days to go into the mail, and when I asked Quibids about this, them blame it on the post office for the long delivery, where with big box items, you receive them usually in two to three days after paying. Also, I’ve found, that the retail price Quibids tell you, in most cases, is a lot higher than you will get by going to a retail outlet and purchasing. I also don’t agree with this voucher bid thing, because they want full retail price for them, but don’t have the buying power of a .60 cent bid, and have found that at least 50 to 60 % of their items for sale are their own voucher bids. Where are all of these great items they advertize ??. Maybe one or two in a 24 hr period, and you have 30 to 40 people bidding on them.
      I find over all, that if you like to gamble, Quibids is good, simply because you can use their buy it now process, where in a casino, your money is gone for good.

    17. Dianne says:

      I was drawn into the quibids website. I don’t know what happened. It happened so fast. I signed up and the next thing I know my credit card was being charged $60.00 and I was told I placed 97 real bids. Whatever that is. I know that I clicked a couple of times on a single item that kept moving around the screen. No more than 7 or 8 times and then I thought maybe something was wrong . That’s when I looked into my checking account, and wham immediaetly charged. I tryed to contact their customer service department, and they were closed. What a scary feeling. I was sorry I signed up. I am usually very cautious, but I guess like most people we all would love to have a bargin.

      • susan says:

        I think many people are used to downloading free software and computer related things without reading the terms of agreement before click on on the box that say you have read them. This sort of business prays on that bad habit. Also, NEVER use a debit card on the internet……no way to contest a problem and bank will do nothing to help you. A credit card affords the ability to contest a charge that will be handled by the card company and the charge will not go through until resolved. I always take the time to read the terms and have been glad I did. Quibids is not a scam but a very well engineered business that makes money off overzealous uninformed people.

    18. MAClar says:

      I have not yet joined the QuiBids site but am thinking about it. I have read many reviews and I have to say that it seems that the complainers do not understand how it works. Judging from some of their spelling and grammar mistakes in their posts they aren’t very bright either.

      QuiBids makes their money by selling you bids at $0.60 a pop, so what. If 100 bids are made they make $60.00, if 1000 bid are made they make $600.00 and if only 10 bids are made they make a whopping S6.00. You know you are paying for the bids before you even start. If you make 10 bids and you don’t win you loose $6.00. That is just the chance you take. They don’t guarantee that you are going to win.

      Seriously, how many of you people complaining drop $10.00 or more on the the lottery each week hoping to win the million dollar jackpot? If your ticket doesn’t win do you ask for you money back? Of course not. As the man says, “You pays your money and you takes your chances.”, so quit whining.

      • Think before you type! says:

        I find your post most entertaining. It’s not about the way people spell their words nor is it about their grammar. Perhaps you should check your own spelling/grammar before questioning others.

        I’d also suggest you might like to use the $ symbol instead of the letter S when it’s money related.

        As the man says “He who lives in glasshouses, should not be the first to throw stones!”

        • David says:

          No offense, but what spelling/grammar errors are you referring to in his post and second, there is a $ in front of his numerical amounts.
          I do have to agree with his post. If you can’t afford to lose the money, don’t play. If you don’t read the directions or engage the tutorials and you leap blindly without knowing what’s on the other side, then the risk you take and the consequences are entirely on you, not Quibids. They have provided more than adequate instruction on how their auction site works. People have become so lititgious and so “entitled” that they complain about everything that doesn’t go their way, as though it is someone else’s fault. Well, newsflash, no one is cheating you or being unfair or scamming you. You are just too stupid to “look before you leap”. Start taking personal accountability for your actions instead of looking to blame everyone but yourself. Remember, when you point the finger at someone else, you have 3 others pointing back at you.

          • kim perkins says:

            EXCELLENT COMMENT! If only more people had this COMMON SENSE and didnt feel like they were entitled to EVERYTHING, this country wouldnt be in such bad shape! Nobody knows how to take responsability for THEIR OWN ACTIONS anymore

    19. Bob says:

      quibids is not a scam but you will have very small chances of winning something.

      • Jan Menkens says:

        Not really, I won my first two items for one cent each, the smaller items are a good way to start to get use to bidding. (I was probably very lucky) too!

        • JM says:

          After reading these comments and having my own experience I think I have a better understanding of what is going on. I too somehow managed to sign up and pay $60.00 without realizing how that happened. I too figured I must have done something wrong. I tried to find a way to get back to that page to see if I had missed something, but it was gone.
          Warning #1 – if you are curious about this site and want to see how it works somehow you will end up buying a beginner’s bid package for $60.00 and will now know how that happened.
          I have also realized that there is likely some bids put up for beginners that only they can bid on, because I too won my first two bids for a penny (which ends up costing 1 penny, plus $0.60 and $2.99 each for shipping totalling $3.60 each win). Both were small items (a $25.00 and $10.00 gift card). Since this is a gambling site, I’m sure they know the research on how to get people to gamble. If people win, even a small amount, they are likely to be hooked and try to win more. It would not surprise me at all if the site sets it up so all newcomers win something for a small price to entice them to keep going. I believe that to be true because I have watched many of these auctions and have never since seen a person win a small item for a penny.
          I, however, didn’t bid much after that. I took Quibids online advice and started to study the auctions. What I discovered is that I got punished for that. The site restricted my access to certain auctions. In the terms and conditions it says they can restrict your access to your level. But when I compared the auctions available before signing in and after I do not believe that to be the reason. The auctions I was allowed to bid on were not beginner auctions. I believe it was designed to entice me to bid on auctions I would likely never win.
          I do not think it is a scam. I think it is a brilliant business plan that uses research to hook people into gambling and in the process is making a fortune. Nothing new there.
          I have seen $25.00 gift cards go for $3.00 which doesn’t seem like a lot until you realize that each dollar is 100 bids. Quibids would make $155.00 off of that gift card. I saw an iPad go for almost $90.00. Quibids made $5300.00 on that. Many people would have lost hundreds of dollars bidding. And the person who won it ended up paying more than he would in the store when you factor in shipping costs and the cost of his/her bids.
          The good items like iPads are infrequent. The more common items are voucher bids -which is sold as a way to get “free bids” except that you pay for them initially when you bid. So they really aren’t free. Very good marketing trick though. I’ve seen Quibids make hundreds of dollars off of something that costs them nothing. There are hundreds of these voucher auctions per day and maybe one cool electronic. And tons of gift cards.
          I, alas, am not a gambler. I am far too practical to gamble. So I have asked for a refund of the bids I didn’t use. According to the terms and conditions they will refund your bids up to a year after purchase. We’ll see!

          • Chris says:

            To say that the winning bidder ends up paying much more than the actual cost of the ipad would be true if the person who won wasnt capable of basic math to figure out how much they can spend and get it for a deal. If people would just look at each bid as 61 cents instead of a penny they now know how much they are spending to win. considering the average cost of an ipad is 600 dollars. thats 366 bids that they would need to place to spend the equivilant. that would mean on a 90$ bid they would be responsible for 3.66 cents of that price.

    20. Phil says:

      Think about this. For example. If the winning bid is $100.00 on a 55″ Plasma TV, Quibids grosses $6,000.00. Now I have no problem with any company making money, however, I think that’s a little exorbitant. All the other item, more than likely, have the same gross profit. Like I said EXORBITANT ! Also, I don’t know what type of controls there are to assure that the sight itself doesn’t bid against you on a big ticket item. I purchased $60 worth of bids, ( which I didn’t realize I was doing ) Probably my fault. Thankfully, I found a way to get it back in the form of 2 Walmart gift certificates. Deleted my credit card, & won’t go back. Any company that makes such enormous profits at my expense, is not for me

      • Jan Menkens says:

        I started an account of Qui Bids just yesterday, and I agree I did not realize that when I started my account I was actually ordered 100 bids for $60.00 that was automatically charged to my account. However I bid on two items (small ones) but I won each of then for a penny plus my .60 bid cost, the shipping was very reasonable and I even asked Qui Bids to send me a refund for my unused bid and they did it immediately. So I really can’t complain.
        But one needs to watch bidding, read everything and fully understand before beginning to play it can be habit forming but you can get some great deals too

        • rayna says:

          So if i sign up will i be charged automatically?

          • Adam says:

            Put it this way: If you see a page asking for your credit card info: Don’t fill it out.

            • Dee G says:

              Okay, really? As soon as I went in to sign up, I saw that I was buying 100 bids for $60. People – please read!! It’s really not that hard to understand as long as you read – because it was all there – in pretty big lettering, I might add.

    21. pat lavine says:

      I got in early quite a while back and had several winners. Got out when it became really congested and tough to get a winner. I have no problem with the concept but you are one of many going after the same thing. I now hunt for bid sites just starting and give them a try. Less competitive and a good chance to win for a while. Keep bid balance low and bail when it starts eating away the good money.

      • I too won quite a few auctions. ( nice items at a real discount ) Then all of a sudden I could not win any more. If you move your mouse over the other bidders names, it will tell you the date that they joined. When I saw that the items I was bidding on, were being bid on by people that joined the same day, and had no experience, I started to figgure what was going on. Every time I would bid on something, at least 4 other bidders that had just joined the same day as the auction would keep out bidding me. I think they make up the names to keep the bidding going higher and higher. They lost me.

    22. Brian says:

      william schillereff, did you read the rules before you signed up……..don’t blame them for something you agreed to…..it was your choice, and gathering from what you said it does not seem that you stuck it out for very long.

      What did you expect, that as soon as you signed on you were going to win something right away? They did not defraud you but you did it to yourself. QueBids like all business exist to make money. I guarantee you that many brick-and-mortar business are selling you their products for far more than what they should sell it for.

      • Phil says:

        Open your eyes Brian, they profit .60 cents every bid. Do the math. There is no Brick & Mortar business that enjoy the margins that Quibids does. If they did, they’d be out of business in no time flat.

    23. Brian says:

      No doubt if they are doing anything illegal the government would shut it down, so only grumpy, sore losers and people who are not willing to stick it out would say it’s a scam.

      • Diana says:

        Brian, as defensive as you seem, I can’t help but wonder if you are a representative of Quibids. I am very upset with myself for joining this auction site. On one hand, I blame myself for getting “sucked in”. On the other hand, I blame Quibids for making it next to impossible to win anything of value. The only auctions I won were vouchers for “free bids”. I knew I was spending $60.00 to join, but I did not know how quickly those bids would be gone with nothing to show in return. Also, if you don’t use your bids in a timely manner, you lose them. I keep getting emails telling me that some of my bids are expiring. Why? I paid for them, why should they expire? I agree with the others who said this is not a scam but they certainly do take advantage of people. This was the biggest waste of $60.00 ever, I’m just glad I got out before I lost more.

    24. Jake invic says:

      A great business…if you own it. I have little sympathy for the people who are being robbed by this site. There are way too many “unintelligent” and greedy people who need a life lesson to realize that if its sounds too good to be true it is. People are so quick to buy into some stupid commercial that promises deals without actually using there head and question how any business can give out such deals and pay for TV commercial time. Live and learn.

      • Jonathan says:

        Exactly! If your own this business, then your sitting in high cotton. I decided to spend the $60 just to see what it was like. I knew my $60 would be spent with little or nothing to show for but I was super curious. My final opinion of this site is it is way to congested. I even got up at 3 am and tried to bid on beginner items and still, there were 8-12 bidders on $10 items all over the site; in fact I couldn’t find any auction that didn’t have multiple bidders. Of course you will see them where the auction closes with minimal bidders but those are few and far between. I also watched the big ticket item(s) bidding. A 55″ TV took 1.5 days to complete so if you have that time and $$ to spend, then more power to you. I consider the odds of winning a big ticket item much worse than winning at black jack in Vegas. I have an engineering degree but couldn’t figure out any strategy in winning. I tried to figure an average sell price of each item was but it was so different, an average calculated price didn’t even come close. If you decide to try it out, good luck. Treat your money like you would in Vegas b/c it’s a gamble. Yes there are winners everyday but there are also winners everyday when it comes to the lottery jackpots.

        • bob says:

          it would be a really cool idea if it wasn’t manipulated – i have no problem with the concept, it’s just the way it’s manipulated that is wrong

    25. H says:

      Quibids is nothing different then going to a Casino and gambling. If you understand the concept of it it is great!!! You can also decide what items you want to bid on and keep an eye on the trend of the last items sold and for how much etc. I have only spent 80 dollars and now am a proud owner of a new camera, juicer, gift certificates, blender, and ipod retailed at around 700 dollars. Its a risk though and not for everyone

    26. Chris P says:

      I don’t understand why people buy things this way. If I need a new TV because the old one broke I go research Consumers Reports and look at the manufacturers website and decide exactly the model I want. I then look for the cheapest deal and buy it.

      People on these auction sites seem not that distant from hoarders – buying stuff “just because”. I don’t need stuff that’s available cheap – you don’t buy things because they are a “good deal” – that’s silly.

      People complain about the cost of gas but are happy to wile away the hours bidding on stuff they don’t need.

      Sad.

    27. william schillereff says:

      This a now you see it now you don’t but you can watch your money disappear at 60 cents a bid. Think you can get a bargain with one 60 cent bit? If you said no you can bet your bippy your correct. Think about it. They advertise these cheap prices but once inside Madams Crib they tell you there may be 1500 bids on one itouch. Consider the profit to QuiBids 60 cents 1500 times makes Quibids profit about 600 smackers. Whey can afford to buy wholesale from apple old stock and still come up with several hundred percent profit. The rules are an exercise in obfusication or smoke and mirrors. The final blow comes when you realize you have spent 60 dollars for 120 bids just to get inside the auction to look around. That happens as slippery as a pickpockets hand and it takes a moment to realize you have been fleeced.

      I am sorry dr. Oz and others who appear reputable endorse QuiBids because the credibililty of these folks will diminish soon. If your an investor buy the stock just don’t buy the product! If you invest get in and out before the customers realize the are in a shell game. I guess Oz can afford to invest in a scam because he certainly does not practice medicine anymore therefore does not need creditability .

      I deactivated my account without bidding and in a few minutes managed to lose 60 dollars. They did not offer it back.

      • Bond says:

        Mate they’re in business to make a profit.
        Know and understand the game before condemning.
        My cousin got the iPad 2 and paid 15 bucks for it winning the bidding game and 30 bucks for shipping.
        Good deal

      • pat says:

        i agree with you 100% however you should not have lost your money if u didnt bid on anything what i did i called them back after doing an extensive research on the web to find their customer service phone number which for some reason is not listed on the website and they gave me back my mula and cancelled my account

      • Phil says:

        Here’s how you get your original $60.00 back. You bid on an item that’s retailing for $50.00, when you’ve reached $50.00 in bids, ( that’s about 84 bids )the site will not allow you to bid anymore. It will say You can purchase the item through the “buy now” They will credit the $50.00 you bid towards the item, you’ll pay shipping on top. So in the case of a gift card, it will cost you $2.00 shipping. So you’ll at least get back $48.00. If it’s any concellation, you’ll still have like 20 bids left.

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